Blog Meme Participants, all Some Get Scared and Run For The Hills

Edit: Amended the title to be more factually correct!

Cornering the link market some say, “counterfeit links” others mention…recently I wrote of the 2000 project that started slowly, gained a lot of momentum, and then just like the darlings of any stock market it fell from grace when the people who write the blogging rules stepped in and started slapping wrists.

I am not surprised, and anyone who knows how these blog ranking systems work should not be as well. As usual, just like the Z-List, what started as a good thing, suddenly gets all crazy, and people who are not on it or even on it cry afoul, some complain to Google and Technorati found out about it, and the whole thing just goes down the drain.

So sadly to prevent Design Sojourn from falling off the overloaded link band wagon, and getting black-marked by Google and Technorati, I’ve decided to remove the entire link collection and only link to the original site which has all the images.

I think this reflects the real spirit of the project and that is having 2000 of the world’s bloggers on one site. It just got out of control when Tino got people to put up the entire set of links on their own site, he has since sadly decided to take it down.

Am I scared? A little, but more scared of the unknown. What I am is a whole lot more concerned as I don’t want almost 1.5 years of quality design articles and design tips to go to waste. It seems Google and Technorati do black-mark such “link farming” activities as I did not get any links from Tino’s new 2000 bloggers blog, and I only found out about this fall from grace from 2nd hand information.

However the negative fallout of such lists only highlight the stupidity of blog ranking systems and the idea of blog popularity based on such rankings. Here at Design Sojourn I get decent traffic not crazy but decent (average 200 unique visitors a day) traffic and that is pretty good for me. Simply because I get a lot of repeat visitors (my repeat page views more than doubles my uniques visitors) and I can take the time to meet and chat with all the people that visit my site personally, either by comments or email. To me cultivating repeat visitors who become my friends is reward enough for me.

Brian Ling (Design Sojourn)

Brian is a multidisciplinary Design Leader with more than 18 years of experience leading strategic design programs that drives successful Brands and Fortune 500 businesses such as GE, Philips, Nakamichi, Flextronics, Ericsson, Hannspree, and HP. His passion is in helping organisations leverage on Design Driven Innovation to make people’s lives better.

    Pingback: 2000 Bloggers and Hypocrisy | Andy Beard - Niche Marketing

  • csven

    .  9 years ago

    “Well it is! If you look at your name on the left of your post comment, its a link back to your website is it not?”

    No. It isn’t a discussion being documented by Technorati.

    First off, it isn’t a “trackback”. There’s no response to this blog entry on the other side. It’s nothing more than a link to my blog’s front page.

    Second, Technorati *isn’t* scraping that link because it’s not on the front page here. So even if it *were* linking back to a response (part of the discussion, or “conversation” as Technorati defines it), there’d still be no documentation of this conversation.

    In addition, it isn’t being added to my Technorati ranking (nor should it be). So basically its only use is for your visitors… and their use of it is *not* recorded by Technorati.

    “Well I cant complain as its a free service and they do track 55 million blogs.”

    Actually, you could complain. While it’s a “free” service, it’s a business that’s making money off of your labor (you might remember Regine’s problems last year – http://www.we-make-money-not-art.com/archives/008634.php

    “I have the same problem and just reciently deleted all the feeds I have not read in the lase 6th months!”

    hahaha. All-you-can-eat can be difficult to digest.

    “congrats on your retainer”

    Thanks. But that ended on 01 Jan (and I declined another project – too many hours/week). Now on to other things.

    Reply
  • Design Translator

    .  9 years ago

    Note that I’ve not left any trackbacks. This “good discussionâ€

    Reply
  • csven

    .  9 years ago

    correction: “to see if people still complain about me NOT showing the whole post”

    Reply
  • csven

    .  9 years ago

    “Always a good discussion. … The assumption here is people who talk more about the issue, will leave their website as a trackback.”

    Note that I’ve not left any trackbacks. This “good discussion” is not being documented by Technorati.

    “BTW that PDF link did not work?”

    Wish I could preview a comment so I could test code. If I could, I would. In any event, this should do (but it’ll be copy and paste): napsterization.org/stories/archives/BlogServiceComparison.pdf

    “However the use of the “moreâ€

    Reply
  • Design Translator

    .  9 years ago

    Hi csven,

    Always a good discussion.

    Tracking links is *not* tracking “what people are sayingâ€

    Reply
  • csven

    .  9 years ago

    “Actually Tecnorati does track readers to a blog.”

    To my knowledge Technorati doesn’t track visitors. It tracks links. Nothing more.

    “Not only does it track blogrolls or links on your sidebar, it also tracks links in your main posts AND links like your website you have entered when you left a comment here. Thus they do track what people are saying.”

    Tracking links is *not* tracking “what people are saying”. Technorati only logs the blog entry, not the conversation – the “what” – that’s carried on comments.

    “Somehow the engine is able to distinguish between links in a blogroll or sidebar that is permanent, and links in your post or comments that gets archived.”

    Actually, unless things have changed, Technorati still favors front page links and thus blogrolls have an advantage over blog entries. You might find this interesting: (PDF) edit: dead link removed.
    Be sure to read Note 6. By using the “more” tag, you’re not only moving content off the front page, your making it inaccessible to Technorati. Thus any links after that tag aren’t counted. Again, only if this hasn’t changed, say, in the past year or so. I’ve not bothered to pay attention (and besides, I don’t use the “more” tag until I condense an entry; usually about a week after posting which is when I move it off the first page).

    “I guess (and this is guessing here) that’s why if you look at your technorati rank its a number derived from (xxx links from yyy blogs). Of which the “xxx linksâ€

    Reply

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