Autumn in Nanjing

China is actually a wonderful place with many interesting things that shows its culture evolving as it finds a happy relationship between east and west. Enjoy the photos.
Colorful lunch
A lunch of stir fry vegetables and pork that was both colorful to look at and taste.
Mobile Phone in Lifts
I hate the fact that mobile phones get cut off in the lift. Obviously someone figured our that communications is vital in China and subsequently designed this lift and sign to remind you of the fact this lift is communication friendly.
Christmas Trees
Christmas Trees in China?
Lamp Post
Not sure how this street lamp works?
Love Machine
Hack up a tube of speakers and you have your “Love Machine”!
Onion buds
The resourcefulness of the Chinese constantly amazes me. I found this outside a small eatery where we had lunch.
Onion Buds
They were growing onions right outside their shop in a plot of earth surrounding a tree. The plot was beautifully cared for.
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Dinner was a fantastic scary oily mess that was oh so amazing!
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At a local Nanjing shopping area. East meets West as Burger King is situated below classic Chinese architecture.
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A kiosk advertising Peanut Milk. Peanut Milk???
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Traditional Chinese snacks with my favourite roasted chestnuts in charcoal in baskets on the left.
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Amazing feats of civil engineering as bridges criss-cross over each other.
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Now my favourite, if you can ignore the spelling mistake. But the genius is the way the graphic designer played with the symbols for recyclable and non-recyclable.

11 Comments
  • Mirko

    October 29, 2007 at 9:47 pm Reply

    Man, China is such a wonderful country… I’ve never been to Nanjing so far but I will go there one day for sure.
    Really love the way the designer played with the recyclable logo on the last pic.

  • DT

    October 29, 2007 at 10:04 pm Reply

    Hi Mirko,
    Thanks for stopping by and leaving comments.

  • endsig

    October 30, 2007 at 12:08 pm Reply

    China an amazing place, I have been here studying for a few months and I am always surprised or find something new everyday. The recycling logos were one of the things that I also noticed – they are on every set of recycling-bin/trashcan in china.

  • endsig

    October 30, 2007 at 12:15 pm Reply

    my wording doesn’t really convey what i meant. happens when your up all night finishing assignments. I meant that the exploded logo on the non-recyclable bin appears on almost every bin that is in that sort of configuration. There are also a few other interesting variations around the place, pity you can’t post pics in comments.

  • DT

    October 30, 2007 at 9:07 pm Reply

    Hi endsig,
    I know what you mean and thanks for commenting.
    BTW you can post images but you will need to host it and use html img tags to help you along.

  • drew kora

    October 31, 2007 at 8:27 am Reply

    Those onions growing on a street planter blow my mind. If you tried to grow onions in a planter in New York City, you’d have to tolerate the company of cigarette butts, gum, and urine. haha.

  • Lisa

    November 1, 2007 at 6:38 am Reply

    Your photos are awesome. I’ve never been to China but I would love to go. Your photos really help bring the city to life.
    Thanks for sharing these.

  • DT

    November 2, 2007 at 11:35 am Reply

    Hi Lisa,
    Thanks for your kind comments and please keep in touch.

  • saikat

    November 5, 2007 at 10:10 pm Reply

    really cool “non-recyclable” sign!
    ūüôā

  • jasper

    November 6, 2007 at 11:19 am Reply

    we have the same recyclable/non-recyclable signs in Shanghai – but most Chinese people don’t know why they should separate.

  • jasper

    November 6, 2007 at 11:26 am Reply

    actually they don’t have to because the job is done mostly by poor people – they cycle around the city collecting PET bottles, PS foam, glas etc.. and bring it to collection points or micro shredder businesses and get paid for it – i think for 1 PET bottle they get around 1 jiao (10jiao= 1RMB) or less. It’s quite efficient and people can live of it.

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